Hayley
Benifical and Harmful Effects on Micro orginisms
GoAnimate.com: Benificial and Harmful Effects of Micro orginisms by HayleyG

Like it? Create your own at GoAnimate.com. It's free and fun!

Animals and their Adaptations





What am I Science
Cells, Tissues, Organs and Systems

1. Explain the relationship between cells, tissues, organs and systems.

The relationship between these parts of the body is that alike cells in the body join all together to form tissues. One by one the tissues then become organs and a number of organs together form a system. They are like one big family.

2. State with examples that organs are a group of tissues that coordinate to do a specific job

Lungs-bring oxygen into our body and releases carbon dioxide.
Mouth-the mouth chews up the food and makes it easier to digest
Liver-to produce substances that break down fats and convert glucose to glycogen
Heart- pump the blood around your body
Small Intestine- Digestion of fats, proteins and carbohydrates contained in the foods you consume, is completed within the small intestine

3. Identify a variety of organ systems in animals and recall that they are made up of different organs with a special purpose working together.

System of the Body
Organs in the Body
Job or function
Musculo-skeletal
Muscle, bones
Support and move the body
Digestive
stomach, liver, intestine, pancreas
Digest and absorb feed
Circulatory
heart, blood vessels
Carries substances around the body, help it stay alive
Respiratory
muzzle, windpipe, lungs
Breathing
Urinary
kidneys, bladder
Get rid of poisons and waste
Nervous
brain, nerves spinal cord
Pass messages around the body, control the body
Sensory
eyes, ears, nose skin
Sense and detect things outside the body
Lympho-reticular
lymph nodes, spleen
Protect against infectious diseases, produce blood
4. Recall the word equation for cellular respiration.
Glucose+ Oxygen= Energy+ Carbon Dioxide +Water

Diagram: Can not upload yet


6. Air enters when the diaphragm is lowered due to the movement of muscles. The lower pressure in the chest cavity causes air from the outside causes air from the outside to rush into the lungs



7. Describe the process that occurs inside an alveolus

When air goes into the alveolus, there is an exchange of gases between the alveolus and the blood in the capillaries surrounding the alveolus. Oxygen moves by diffusion from the alveolus into the blood and carbon dioxide moves from the capillaries into the alveolus to be breathed out through the nose


8. Arteries: carry blood under high pressure away from your heart

Veins: They prevent the blood from flowing backwards. They carry blood to the heart

Capillaries: they carry materials such as oxygen and nutrients to the cells and remove wastes such as carbon dioxideHeart: Muscular organ that pumps blood around the body through the circulatory system

Blood: carries food and oxygen to cells, it carries waste away from cells, and serves as a carrier for various disease-fighting cells such as the "white" blood cells. It clots, sealing up small holes quickly. Blood is also important in maintaining a constant temperature in your body.





  1. Make a terminology list using the words that you learnt from the 2 quia activities
Endocrine: secretes hormones that control bodily
Lymphatic: contains nodes that may inflame and indicate the presence of infection
Integumentary: first line of defence against infection and maintains body temperature

Respritory System 28/07/11

  • The function of the respiratory system is to supply the blood with oxygen in order for the blood to deliver oxygen to all parts of the body
  • The respiratory system includes the mouth, nose, trachea, lungs, and diaphragm
  • Air enters when the diaphragm is lowered due to the movement of muscles. The lower pressure in the chest cavity causes air from the outside to rush into the lungs
  • When air goes into the alveolus, there is an exchange of gases between the alveolus and the blood in the capillaries surrounding the alveolus.
  • Oxygen moves by diffusion from the alveolus into the blood and carbon dioxide moves from the capillaries into the alveolus to be breathed out through the nose
  • The equation is Glucose+ Oxygen= Energy+ Carbon Dioxide +Water

Circulatory System 03/08/11




Digestive System
Digestive_System_Diagram.JPG
Outline the function of the following nutrients in keeping the body healthy: carbohydrates, proteins, fats and oils.
Carbohydrates are used for energy
Proteins repair worn out tissue
Fats insulation
12. The function of the digestive system is to break down the food we eat into smaller parts so the body can use them to build and nourish cells and provide energy. The digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. Inside this tube is a lining called the mucosa. In the mouth, stomach, and small intestine, the mucosa contains tiny glands that produce juices to help digest food. The liver and the pancreas, produce digestive juices that reach the intestine through small tubes. The nerves and blood vessels also play a major role in the digestive system.

13. The 3 main functions of the skeletal system are support, protection of internal organs, providing something for the muscles to hold on to, to store nutrients and to produce blood marrow

Give examples of life saving technology that have arisen as a result of improved understanding of the circulatory system 8/08/11
Powerpoint Uploaded to MYOLMC
Excretory System
Functions of the Uninary System

Kidney: 2 kidneys constantly filter blood to produce urine
Ureters: 2 ureters carry urine from the kidneys to the urinary bladder.
Bladder: The urinary bladder stores urine until it is released from the body.
Urethra: is the tube that carries urine from the urinary bladder to the outside of the body
The function of excretory system is to remove the metabolic wastes of an organism. Wastes that are removed include carbon dioxide, water, salt and urea.


Anus
the opening at the end of the digestive system from which faeces exit the body.
Appendix
a small sac located near the start of the large intestine.
Oesophagus
the long tube between the mouth and the stomach. It uses rhythmic muscle movements (called peristalsis) to force food from the throat into the stomach
Gall bladder
a small, sac-like organ located by the duodenum. It stores and releases bile (a digestive chemical which is produced in the liver) into the small intestine.
Large intestine
the long, wide tube that food goes through after it goes through the small intestine. It contains a good bacteria which removes nutrients and water from waste.
Liver
a large organ located above and in front of the stomach. It filters toxins from the blood, and makes bile (which breaks down fats) and some blood proteins. It also stores nutrients
Mouth
the first part of the digestive system, where food enters the body. Chewing and salivary enzymes in the mouth are the beginning of the digestive process (breaking down the food)
Pancreas
A gland located below the stomach and above the intestines that produces enzyme. Enzymes from the pancreas help in the digestion of carbohydrates, fats and proteins in the small intestine. It makes chemicals need to break down food and it also makes insulin.
Rectum
the lower part of the large intestine, where faeces are stored before they are excreted from the body
Small intestine
the long, thin winding tube that food goes through after it leaves the stomach. Nutrients are absorbed into the blood stream here.
Stomach
a sack-like, muscular organ that is attached to the oesophagus. When food enters the stomach, it is churned in an acid bath. It contains digestive juices to break down
Teeth
Chop and grind
Tongue
mixes the food with the saliva
Duodenum
first part of the small intestine where food is broken down further by digestive juices and enzymes
Salivary Glands
make saliva
Enzyme
chemical that breaks down food
Gland
A factory
Insulin
helps cells use sugar
Digestive juices
Acids and enzymes in the stomach that break down food
Bile
yellow-green fluid that breaks down fat